Great Britain under the Spreading Fangs of Caste

 

A K Biswas

Part-I

Caste in New Home

In the voyage of caste to the Western hemi-sphere, the first port of call was Britain. The Hindus take pride that they did not conquer any nation with sword. But they exported caste to sabotage England internally. The cancer has gone deep and assumed so critical a dimension that Queen Elizabeth assented to an amend-ment in the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill in April 2013 when the House of Commons bowed to reassure from the House of Lords to include caste as an aspect of race as part of the Equality Act 2010.1 This is the first country outside India where caste discrimination has been put on the statute book to contain, if not crush, the exploding malignancy.

The 2011 census returned 816,633 Hindus, including 450,000 untouchables referred as Dalits, in England and Wales while the figures for Scotland are yet to be released. Dalits account for 55 per cent of the Hindus. They face the same caste discrimination and atrocities their brethren have to contend with in India. A realisation is yet to dawn on the Hindus in their overseas homes that their conduct and behaviour, practices and peculiarities are anathema to civilised society or congenial human environment. "I shall be satisfied," said Ambedkar, "if I make the Hindus realise that they are the sick men of India and that their sickness is causing danger to the health and happiness of other Indians." The British Hindus have proved his apprehension infallible. The caste malignancy is not confined within the four walls of India; it spilled over as a "danger to the health and happiness" and infected others, forcing the hands of the rulers to act for its suppression. Ambedkar foresaw this: "As Hindus migrate to other regions of the earth, Indian caste would become a world problem." Caste has become a global nuisance, threatening the delicate fabric of social peace, happiness and unity wherever the plague visited.

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किसकी चाय बेचता है तू (Whose Tea Do You Sell)

 

Braj Ranjan Mani

किसकी चाय बेचता है तू

~ ब्रजरंजन मणि

अपने को चाय वाला क्यूँ कहता है तू

बात-बात पे नाटक क्यूँ करता है तू

चाय वालों को क्यों बदनाम करता है तू

साफ़ साफ़ बता दे किसकी चाय बेचता है तू !

 

खून लगाकर अंगूठे पे शहीद कहलाता है

और कॉर्पोरेट माफिया में मसीहा देखता है

अंबानी-अदानी की दलाली से 'विकास' करता है

अरे बदमाश, बता दे, किसकी चाय बेचता है तू !

 

खंड-खंड हिन्दू पाखंड करता है

वर्णाश्रम और जाति पर घमंड करता है

फुले-अंबेडकर-पेरियार से दूर भागता है

अरे ओबीसी शिखंडी, किसकी चाय बेचता है तू !

 

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The Crisis and Challenge of Dalit-bahujans

 

Braj Ranjan Mani

There is no competing cultural vision from below for the mind and heart of India. Dalit-bahujans are still absent in the contest of ideas, policies and visions—the fundamentals on which democratic competition takes place.This paralysis of the mind is linked totheir systemic cultural, intellectual and spiritual destruction. Without reference to history one cannot find even poor answers to the complex problems that keep them divided and demoralized, but the corruption and capitulation of the current dalit-OBC leadership has also aggravated the crisis. There is a burning need to renew and reconstruct an ideology—attempted in the past by Phule, Ambedkar and Periyar—that can pave the way to a broad-based unity for social reconstruction.

Constancy of change is the basic principle of life. Heraclitus made the illusion of permanence clear in the sixth century BCE, and a little later Buddha articulated the same in his theory of dependent origin. As 'everything changes but change itself', it is not surprising that social change is the central tendency in human societies. But the direction of change is largely determined by aspirations and visions of change agents. This implies that things can change a great deal, and yet the social order can remain more or less the same, since the people in the vanguard of change have a vested interest to retain the established hierarchy. Thus, there is a crucial difference between change and social change, development and social development.

Development and Social Development Are Not the Same Thing

While development is a necessary condition of social development, the latter involves the specific direction of development that can ensure larger social justice. Symbolically speaking, development can take a handful of people to the moon—it can produce billionaires like the Ambanis and Mittals with their private planes and palaces while the many remain hungry and homeless—but social development takes place through active participation and conscious choice of majority of citizens. Based on people's voice and choice,social development isco-terminus with uplifting the society as a whole, especially the disadvantaged who have been left behind or kept suppressed, historically and culturally. 

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'Power is not only our legitimate right but also an asset': Thol. Thirumavalavan

Speech delivered by Thol. Thirumavalavan,

M.P., and President, Liberation Panthers Party (VCK)

at 'South Asia Parliamentarians' Conference on Dalit Concerns'

~Enabling Equity & Inclusion~

on 8th -9th December 2013, in Kathmandu, Nepal

~

thiruma in kathmandu 

Respected Chairperson Mr. Paul Divakar, Co-chairperson Mr. Yam Bahadur Kisan, Respected Panel Members of this session - Mr. Ranendra Barali, Mr. Ishrafil Alam, Prof. Chung and all other distinguished guests;

Dear Brothers and Sisters, I wish you all the success.

First of all I would like to express my heartfelt thanks to the organizers for giving me this opportunity to share my experiences. Before I start I would like to salute our great warriors who fought for equality for all, in particular Lord Buddha and our great revolutionary leader Dr. B.R. Ambedkar. I also wish to extend my salute to the warrior Mr. Nelson Mandela who dedicated his life for equality.

We believe that Lord Buddha is our spiritual head, saint and equal to God. In my view he was the great warrior who fought against discrimination, which caused pain and sufferings to the human life. The great revolutionary Dr. Ambedkar and Mr. Nelson Mandela also fought against discrimination based on caste and race.

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The roots of rape in India

 

Kancha Ilaiah

kancha ilaiahRape has, of late, become an acute disease in the Indian society. Prima facie, this is a problem arising out of a mental disorder, but there is also a larger cultural context that, to an extent, explains how the Indian male became so brutal.

Our cultural upbringing conditions male minds to behave in a cruel fashion with women. Family upbringing, societal conditioning, religious sagas and political animus, all construct our men and women into being what they are — men as aggressive and women as submissive. Which is why men here, in India, are different from men in other countries.

Their cultural milieu is different. Their spiritual systems train them differently. It's not that only Indian men rape and kill children aged three or five. This happens in other countries too, but they are the rarest of rare cases. Daily reports of infants being raped across the length and breadth of a country is a phenomenon unique to India, a society that's otherwise highly conservative. Clearly, the institutional upbringing, including that in family, needs to undergo change.

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This Diwali, think why we celebrate death

 

Kancha Ilaiah

kancha ilaiahThere are two prominent stories around the celebration of Diwali. One, this is the day on which Ram returned to Ayodhya and coronated himself as king after killing Ravan. It is also the day when Krishna and his wife Satyabhama killed Narakasur, known as the evil rakshasa. It's the death of the enemy that is celebrated.

Perceptions differ from north and south India about Ram killing Ravan and Krishna killing Narakasur. Diwali day just does not remain a day of lighting lamps, wearing new clothes, worshipping whom one considers god, but also burning massive amount of crackers that pollute the atmosphere so much so that even the health of the forces that keep celebrating would also get damaged. The emissions in urban areas on that day rise to the level of choking people. And several people, especially children, die because of fires and pollution.

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